32 Matches (out of a total of 833 incidents)
  1. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    04/01/2008 Skydive City, FL MAL 45 95 ?/? 322 #3069802
    Description: It appears that on deployment this jumper was renderd incapable of taking control of his canopy and then decended in a turn to the ground,with quite a hard landing. Both brakes were stowed,slider not collapsed.
    Lessons:
  2. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    13/02/2008 Marana, AZ MAL 37 1000 / 321 #3122462
    DropZone.com Description: Military HALO training jump. Suspected to have departed as an 18,000 foot night jump from a local airport with plans of jumping into second airport to have breakfast then depart back for additional training jumps.It appears that the military jumper experienced a brake fire on his main that lead to a spinning malfunction that he failed to cutaway.
    Lessons:
  3. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    07/03/2008 Marana, AZ 35 / 323 #3147113
    DropZone.com Description: Unknown - Military HALO training
    Lessons:
  4. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    12/03/2008 Skydive Spaceland, TX MAL 58 9 Y/Y 326 #3151399
    DropZone.com Description:

    Jumper went unstable while trying to pull for his main parachute on one of his last AFF dives and was tumbling when his AAD activated. The reserve deployed but became entangled with the jumper as it was opening and was prevented from opening correctly. The jumper landed with a partially deployed reserve canopy.

    The instructor chased the student to under 1200 feet when he deployed his main and ended up having an AAD activation and dual canopy deployment.

    Lessons:
    USPA Description: This jumper was performing his ninth skydive, a freefall training jump with a USPA AFF Instructor. This was his seventh AFF training jump following two tandems. After an uneventful initial freefall, this jumper did not initiate his main deployment at the assigned deployment altitude of 5,500 feet. When his instructor gave him a pull sign, the student reached for his bottom-of-container-mounted throw-out pilot chute but grabbed the leg gripper of his jumpsuit instead. As the instructor moved to dock on him to assist with his deployment, the student reached across his own torso with his left hand in an apparent attempt to deploy using that hand. The student then flipped on his back and tumbled away from the instructor, who continued to chase the student to a reported altitude of 1,500 feet before deploying his own main canopy. The student remained in freefall, never deploying his main or reserve parachute. His AAD did deploy his reserve, but the reserve pilot chute and bridle entangled with his arm and stopped the reserve deployment.
    USPA Conclusions:

    There were no indications of freefall stability problems in any of this jumperís previous training skydives. He had successfully met the required tasks on each jump and had also accumulated 40 to 45 minutes of training in a wind tunnel. He may have panicked after realizing he had grabbed his jumpsuit gripper instead of his main pilot chute handle. When he reached across his body toward his right hip with his left arm, it caused him to flip on his back and tumble away from the instructor. The student then appeared to attempt to roll over face to earth, but his de-arched body position kept him in a back-to-earth position.

    Skydiverís Information Manual Section 5-1 recommends that jumpers deploy at an appropriate altitude (no lower than 3,000 feet AGL for students) in a stable, face-to-earth body position; however, a jumperís priority is to pull at the correct altitude, regardless of body position. SIM Section 4 recommends that students who do not find their main deployment handle on their first try make no more than two additional attempts to locate the handle. If a student still cannot deploy his main, he should immediately pull his reserve ripcord. Although deploying in a face-to-earth position is ideal, itís more important to deploy at the assigned altitude, regardless of body position. In most cases, a main canopy deployment while a jumper is back to earth has resulted in a successful opening without any malfunction or entanglement.

    The automatic activation device did activate this jumperís reserve at some point, but itís unknown at what altitude. Investigators found the student with his reserve pilot chute trapped under his arm, with approximately eight feet of reserve bridle out of the container and wrapped around his torso and right arm. This indicates that the reserve deployed while the jumper was spinning on his back, which caused his arm to trap the reserve pilot chute and bridle instead of the pilot chute finding clean air to deploy the reserve.

    Just as deploying a main while back to earth almost always results in a normal deployment, the same is true for reserve canopies; entanglements such as this between the jumper and the deploying reserve canopy or its pilot chute or freebag are rare, even if the reserve is deployed in a less-than-desirable body position. Had the reserve pilot chute not been trapped by the jumperís arm, the result would likely have been a fully deployed reserve parachute.

    The instructor attempted to dock with the student once he saw him experiencing a problem with his deployment but was unable to dock and assist before the student rolled over and tumbled away. AFF instructors are trained and evaluated in assisting with student deployments, and itís a good idea for AFF instructors to stay no more than an armís length from each student whenever possible, even when students are performing well during a skydive. All instructors are trained to deploy their own main canopy no lower than 2,000 feet, regardless of whether the student has deployed. The report indicated that this instructor initiated his main canopy deployment at 1,500 feet. By the time his main canopy inflated and began to slow his descent, his AAD had activated his reserve canopy. Even though both canopies inflated properly and he landed without incident, the low deployment placed him at additional risk of a main-reserve entanglement.

  5. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    23/03/2008 Skydive Tahoe, NV MAL 28 8000 / 325 #3161431
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper experienced a spinning main malfunction on a canopy loaded at over 2.4 pounds per sq foot. He was unable to cutaway for unknown reasons and struck the ground while still in a high speed spin.
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  6. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    27/03/2008 Deland, FL 24 350 / 327 #3165618
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper was making an approach for landing in deep brakes and attempted to make a turn and in the process stalled the canopy. The canopy stalled out and she landed on pavement. She suffered fatal head injuries even though she was wearing a full face helmet.
    Lessons:
    USPA Description: After an uneventful freefall and initial canopy descent, this jumper flew her canopy downwind to approximately 100 feet above the ground, then initiated a 180-degree braked turn on to final in an apparent effort to conserve altitude and face into the wind for landing. After the jumper had completed her turn, the canopy surged forward abruptly and lost the remaining altitude (approximately 30 to 40 feet) rapidly while she was over an asphalt taxiway. Although she fully flared the canopy at approximately five to 10 feet above the ground, she struck the asphalt in a steep descent before the canopy had a chance to react to the flare and slow her descent. She hit the ground with her knees and then her head, suffering head injuries and multiple broken bones, including both femurs and her pelvis. She was airlifted to a hospital, where she died of her injuries the next day.
    USPA Conclusions:

    It is unclear why this jumper flew the downwind leg of her canopy pattern to such a low altitude of 100 feet before trying to face into the wind for landing. There were no reports of canopy traffic or obstacles in the area. The jumper most likely did realize that she was at a low altitude since she initiated a braked turn, apparently in an effort to conserve altitude and face into the wind for landing. Winds were reported between five and 10 mph at the time of her landing.

    Investigators reported that the jumper may have performed the braked turn with too much toggle input (brakes pulled too deeply) causing the canopy to stall as it turned before surging forward with a rapid descent rate. Even though the jumper had tried to salvage the landing by flaring hard with both toggles, there was not enough altitude for the canopy to slow its rapid descent before she struck the ground.

    Other witnesses reported that the canopy had completed the braked turn without stalling and that the jumper let the canopy toggles all the way up to full flight at approximately 30 to 40 feet above the ground, which caused the canopy to surge forward at a low altitude. They added that the canopy was still in a steep descent when she fully flared the canopy at five to 10 feet, and then she struck the ground hard before the canopy could level off from the landing flare.

    Regardless of whether the canopy was stalled from a deep-braked turn at approximately 30 feet or was returned to full flight from a deep-braked position, the result was essentially the same: As the canopy surged forward out of its slow flight, it accelerated forward and went into a dive, which caused the jumper to pendulum behind the canopy. This increased the angle of attack of the canopy, further accelerating it toward the ground. She flared the canopy in an attempt to level off the wing, but there was not enough altitude for the flare to be effective.

    This jumper was using a 120-square-foot main canopy at a wing loading of almost 1.6:1, which is recommended for jumpers classified as expert by the canopy manufacturer. The report did not indicate how long this jumper had been using this canopy, but with only 350 jumps total under her belt, she would have had to rapidly downsize to jump such a small canopy so early in her skydiving career. Most industry experts agree that 350 jumps does not classify a jumper as an expert.

    Braked turns work well to conserve altitude; however, jumpers should receive coaching for the different methods used to perform braked turns and practice this type of turn often at higher altitudes above the landing pattern to become familiar with the maneuver. Moving to full flight from a braked approach should also be practiced at higher altitudes to learn how much altitude each canopy requires to recover to straight and level flight. Practice up high will help each jumper become familiar with the toggle inputs that work best for the wing loading and canopy used for the maneuvers. Jumpers should practice these maneuvers again with each new canopy to become familiar with the canopyís performance characteristics while flying in a variety of brake settings.

    The landing area was large and provided plenty of space to fly a landing pattern that would have allowed for this jumperís base leg and final approach turns at higher altitudes even if it meant landing away from the intended landing spot. In the landing pattern, a turn to final approach at 300 to 500 feet allows for enough altitude to make slight corrections on final to avoid obstacles and still keep the wing level and into the wind for landing, without the added challenges of flying a braked turn just before landing.

  7. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    05/04/2008 Mile Hi Skydiving, CO LOWT 50 2200 Y/Y 329 #3175051
    DropZone.com Description: During a tandem jump the instructor was going downwind in high winds and made a turn to get back into the wind for landing but made the turn too low and ended up hitting the ground about the same time as the canopy struck the ground. The student was declared dead on the airport, the instructor died at the hospital a few hours later.
    Lessons:
    USPA Description: After an uneventful tandem freefall and initial canopy descent, this tandem pair was on final approach at approximately 200 feet above the ground and facing into the wind. The wind speed was reported to be between 15 to 20 mph. While on final, the instructor turned the canopy 180 degrees to a downwind direction, passing another tandem pair who was facing into the wind, and then made an abrupt 180-degree turn at approximately 50 feet in an apparent attempt to face back into the wind for landing. This pairís tandem canopy was still in a steep diving turn as they struck the ground at a high speed. Although both jumpers received immediate medical attention, the student died at the scene, and the instructor died en route to the hospital.
    USPA Conclusions:

    There were a total of four tandem pairs in the air on the load; two of them, including this one, were relatively close together on final approach. Jumpers on the ground waited as each pair landed to catch the tandem canopies (i.e. to collapse the parachutes). This tandem pair was at approximately 200 feet above the ground and had passed over top of the catchers when investigators believe the instructor decided to make a 360-degree turn to shorten his final approach and land closer to the waiting catchers. However, once he was halfway through the turn, the altitude lost during the turn placed him and his student at the same level as a second tandem pair who had been behind and below them and were facing into the wind.

    The two tandems were now facing each other. The second tandem instructor stated that the first tandem pair passed by in a downwind direction and that the first instructor was looking directly at him as he went by. As soon as the first tandem passed the second tandem pair, this tandem instructor initiated a hard 180-degree turn, most likely to try to face into the wind for landing. However, by the time he had passed the facing traffic of the second tandem pair, he had descended to approximately 50 feet, which was much too low to complete a 180-degree turn. This tandem and their canopy struck the ground at nearly the same time, with the canopy still in a steep diving turn.

    As with many fatalities, several factors combined to lead to a fatal outcome. Take away any one of the factors, and the outcome may have changed.

    This was the fourth load of the day at the DZ. Earlier in the day, winds had been above 22 mph, which the drop zone uses as a cutoff point for all jump operations. The pilot and DZ staff monitored the wind as the day progressed, and jumping started once the wind had been below 20 mph for 20 minutes. On each jump, following standard procedures for the drop zone, the pilot checked the wind speed with ground operations in case the winds had picked up after takeoff and increased beyond the 22-mph limit. During this jump run, the wind meter on the ground indicated 15 mph, and the weather reporting station indicated eight knots around the time of the skydive, with a gust to 20 knots at some point in a 10-minute range.

    Once this tandem instructor initially realized he was going to land well beyond the waiting catchers on the ground, a better option may have been to remain facing into the wind and land with the canopy flying straight and level rather than making aggressive turns close to the ground to land closer to his intended target. Even if the tandem catchers would not have been able to reach the pair as they landed, the instructor could have disconnected the reserve static line and pulled the cutaway handle after landing to release the main canopy and avoid being dragged by the main in the strong winds.

    Even after the instructor had decided to make the subsequent attempt at a 360-degree turn, only to pause for traffic halfway through the turn, a better decision may have been to keep the canopy flying straight and level and land in a downwind directionóor possibly turn slightly and land somewhat crosswindórather than initiate another drastic turn so close to the ground. While landing downwind isnít ideal in 15-plus mph winds, the pair would have had the chance to land with little downward speed and most likely been able to slide in the landing, which would provide less chance of an injury than landing in a turn at a high rate of descent.

    Jumping in strong and/or gusty winds has led to many injuries and several fatal landings in the past. Experienced jumpers, solo students, and tandem instructors and their students have all suffered fatal accidents on jumps that took place in conditions where strong winds, gusty winds or a combination of both played a factor in the outcome. Tandem instructors often jump in winds of 15 to 20 mph without incident, especially if the winds are steady and remain smooth throughout the canopy descent and landing. Still, all tandem instructors need to carefully consider the weather conditions along with the many other factors that must be taken into account while jumping in tandem with students.

    While the majority of skydivers manage to land uneventfully when jumping in strong or erratic winds, every jumper, including tandem instructors, needs to consider the additional risks that come with skydiving in these conditions.

  8. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    05/04/2008 Mile Hi Skydiving, CO LOWT 28 1 / 328 #3175051
    DropZone.com Description:
    Lessons:
    USPA Description: After an uneventful tandem freefall and initial canopy descent, this tandem pair was on final approach at approximately 200 feet above the ground and facing into the wind. The wind speed was reported to be between 15 to 20 mph. While on final, the instructor turned the canopy 180 degrees to a downwind direction, passing another tandem pair who was facing into the wind, and then made an abrupt 180-degree turn at approximately 50 feet in an apparent attempt to face back into the wind for landing. This pairís tandem canopy was still in a steep diving turn as they struck the ground at a high speed. Although both jumpers received immediate medical attention, the student died at the scene, and the instructor died en route to the hospital.
    USPA Conclusions:
  9. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    10/05/2008 Skydive Fargo, ND LOWT 37 1600 / 332 #3188264
    DropZone.com Description:

    Kyle was on his 3rd jump of the day. Kyle and another jumper exited the aircraft and had an uneventful freefall. Kyleís canopy opened with no issues according to others on the load. He was observed several times flying his usual approach from the opening area to the landing area. Kyle had no airspace or congestion issues while approaching the landing area. He was the first one into the landing pattern and the first to land. No witnesses were on the ground to see what exactly happened. The only witness for the approach to final was a jumper who was above and behind Kyle (about 1300í AGL with about 1000í of horizontal distance from the landing area) preparing for his landing approach. The jumper witnessed Kyleís last few turns onto final and then a dust cloud after the impact (the initial impact was not observed). Kyle entered his pattern to land from the North to the South. The winds at the time of the accident were light and variable. Kyle was found facing North when the first jumper reached him 30 seconds after impact. The jumper stated that Kyle was unresponsive when he reached him. Approximately 10 seconds later another jumper who was also on the load landed right next to Kyle and the first jumper. This jumper is a paramedic and she started taking medical action immediately. Approximately 35 seconds later a jumper from the hangar arrived with a medical bag. EMS was called via cell phone and they showed up approximately 5-7 minutes later. Kyle was immediately rushed to the hospital where he passed away 9 days later.

    Kyle had over 1600 jumps and was a Tandem Instructor and Coach at Skydive Fargo. Kyleís personal gear is a Javelin container, Icarus 69 VX Main. Kyle was borrowing gear at the time of his accident. He was jumping a Javelin container with an Icarus 99 FX main canopy and a PD 113 reserve. Kyle had an exit weight of about 200lbs Ė Wing loading at about 2:1. He had 4 jumps in the last 30 days and approximately 50 Jumps in the last 12 months.

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  10. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    26/05/2008 Skydive Arizona, AZ CCOL 49 2250 Y/ 336 #3221640
    DropZone.com Description: During a large formation load the jumper was making a straight in approach and overtook another jumper in front of him. The jumpers canopy partially collapsed and he hit the ground with a semi inflated canopy.
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    USPA Description: Following an uneventful multi-aircraft freefall skydive and initial canopy descent, this jumper flew his parachute directly above and behind another skydiver's canopy at approximately 40 feet above the ground. This jumper's canopy collapsed, and he struck the ground hard under his partially inflated main, suffering multiple broken bones and internal injuries. He received immediate medical attention and was airlifted to a local hospital, where he died of his injuries several hours later.
    USPA Conclusions:

    This jumper was taking part in a large formation skydive with approximately 60 other skydivers. Large formations often require each jumper to fly in heavy canopy traffic in an orderly pattern for landing. On his final approach, this jumper's canopy apparently hit the wake turbulence of the canopy in front of him and immediately collapsed.

    Jumpers need to be aware of turbulence hazards to parachutes, which can come from many different sources. Each canopy creates a wake vortex capable of collapsing any parachute behind it; the turbulent air is found directly behind and above the canopy as it flies through the air. Additionally, wind passing over obstacles such as trees and buildings is disrupted, causing turbulence that can be found on and near the ground directly downwind of the obstructions. Skydiver's Information Manual Section 4 explains the effects of turbulence on canopies in Category C of the Integrated Student Program and cautions jumpers to anticipate turbulence 10 to 20 times the height of an obstacle on the downwind side. If possible, this jumper should have avoided the wake turbulence of the canopy in front of him by flying to the side of the canopy, rather than directly behind it.

  11. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    07/06/2008 Skydive Duanesberg, NY SUI 29 0 / 338 #3232178
    DropZone.com Description: Person was flying as an observer on the Cessna 182 aircraft with out a parachute. When the tandem and videoflyer exited the man took off his seatbelt and jumped out of the airplane before the pilot could stop him. The man was seen in freefall falling on his back taking pictures of himself. He struck a house roof on the ground.
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  12. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    21/06/2008 St. Louis Skydiving Center, MO AIR 175 N/ 345 #3246736
    DropZone.com Description:

    A jumper with 175 jumps was doing a hop ní pop out of the Beech 99 at 5,000 feet. Before the load the jumper let the pilot know that he would like to do a hop ní pop to which the pilot advised the jumper that he would give him the green light over the windsock. According to witnesses on the aircraft, as the plane approached 5,000 feet, the jumper opened the door and exited the airplane in a ďleapingĒ exit, jumping up with a good deal of force. The green light had not come on yet and the airplane was approximately 0.6 miles prior to the airport (~0.9 miles prior to the intended spot) still in a climbing attitude under full power. The jumper struck his head on the horizontal stabilizer, approximately 8 feet out from the fuselage. A witness in the airplane saw the jumper grab his face after the impact and then continue to tumble until losing sight of him. The jumper was found approximately 1.5 hours later in some dense woods with nothing deployed.

    According to the pilot, he was just about to begin his level-off for jump-run when he felt a slight bump. He realized that a jumper had exited and commented to the jumper in the right seat that ďhe hadnít even turned on the green light yet,Ē not yet realizing what had happened to the exiting jumper. Standard procedure calls for the pilot to level off, pull back the power, put down the flaps, and start a slight descent to keep the tail high on jump-run. With the jumper exiting early, the plane was still in a nose-high, tail-low, high-power configuration.

    The aircraft landed uneventfully and a search was immediately commenced. With the help of over 50 search personnel on the ground and in the air, the jumperís body was located shortly thereafter. The jumper was using borrowed gear while waiting for replacement parts for his own rig. Neither the borrowed rig, nor his own equipment had an AAD, nor was the jumper wearing a helmet.

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  13. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    21/06/2008 Skydive Elsinore, CA MAL 39 2500 /N 347 #3246379
    DropZone.com Description: The jumper opened his canopy after videoing a tandem skydive at about 3500ft - 3000ft. Due to a long spot, he did not release his breaks immediately, but left them set and flew back closer to the DZ, perhaps with the additional aid of the rear risers. During this time, the jumper reconfigured his harness and camera-jacket by opening up the chest strap, and releasing his camera-jacket wings at the lower attachment. At some point, the jumper released his main breaks and discovered that the right break line had a solid tension knot just below the cat-eye. Somewhere around 2000ft, the jumper elected to cutaway. It is suspected that the jumper was correcting the resulting right hand turn with the left control line just prior to cutting away, and as a result did not have the reserve handle in his hand.
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  14. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    03/07/2008 Batavia, NY NOP,MED? 61 800 N/ 355 #3258410
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper was attending a Boogie and was getting recurrent after not jumping since the same boogie the previous year. He had recieved a refresher course before the jump including use of a BOC and flying the pattern under canopy.On this skydive he was doing a 2 way with another experienced jumper, at exit he rushed the door and did not give seperation between his group and the group in front of him. In freefall he was observed to be completing the formations until about 6000 feet where he broke off early and tracked away. He was seen falling 50-100 feet away from the previous group at 2500 feet unstable and head down. The jumper did not deploy any canopies.
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  15. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    04/07/2008 Skydive Perris, CA MAL 51 2000 / 353 #3258666
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper suffered some sort of malfunction where the Removable Deployment System became entangled with the main canopy. The jumper attempted to land this but the canopy ended up sprialing at a low altitude until the jumper struck the ground.
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  16. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    04/07/2008 Mid-America Sport Parachute Club, IL DMAL 54 1 Y/Y 349 #3258746
    DropZone.com Description:

    Students first jump via IAD method. Right after opening the main was spinning and slider up. Student was told over the radio to pull both toggles all the way down and let them back up. Still spinning with slider up, the jumper was told to cut away but he didn't. Was told over and over to pull the red cutaway handle. Student finally did so at about 1,000ft. or lower. Reserve pilot chute wrapped around his arm but still started to deploy the reserve. He impacted with the reserve just leaving the bag and beginning to snivel. AAD fired at some point.

    Post inspection of the gear saw that only one brake had been released on the main.

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  17. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    21/07/2008 Skydive Kentucky, KY LAND,MED? 47 5000 / 352 #3259420
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper had completed a 2 way freefly and was seen to fly the first portion of his canopy flight normally and was in half brakes. At his entry point into the pattern he was observed to have retunred to an arms up position but failed to make any more input until he landed with out flaring. He landed crosswind in slight wind conditions. He was wearing a Gath freefly helmet but suffered haed trama from striking the ground. Medical examination lead the pathologist to suggest he had a siezure or heart attack under canopy and that lead to his unresponsiveness.
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  18. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    26/07/2008 Skydive The Farm, GA MAL 23 299 Y/N 357 #3280048
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper was seen spinning out of control after releasing his main. Jumper cutaway the malfunctioning main and then pulled the reserve less than 200 feet from the ground. The canopy did not have time to open before hitting the ground.
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  19. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    03/08/2008 Air Indiana Skydiving Center, IN DMAL 36 20 /Y 364 #3287376
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper cutaway from what might have been a spinning line over and wrapped the deploying reserve bridle around his body. He was not able to clear this entanglement prior to hitting the ground.
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  20. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    18/08/2008 Air Adventures, FL CCOL / 363 #3272470
    DropZone.com Description: Jumpers collided under canopy at a low altitude. One jumper flew into the side of another jumepers canopy and both ended up falling to the ground.
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  21. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    18/08/2008 Air Adventures, FL CCOL / 360 #3272470
    DropZone.com Description: Jumpers collided under canopy at a low altitude. One jumper flew into the side of another jumepers canopy and both ended up falling to the ground.
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  22. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    22/08/2008 OH NOP,EXC 21 N/N   #3307712
    Description: The deceased jumped from a helicopter equipped with a single-parachute BASE container and a Phoenix-Fly Vampire V2 wingsuit. He was observed struggling to extract the pilot chute from the leg pouch of the wingsuit at a few hundred feet. He managed to deploy the pilot chute, but at a very low altitude with insufficent height to inflate the parachute and died on impact.
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  23. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    13/09/2008 Carolina Skydiving, NC DMAL? 38 /    
    Description: Bill Booth says, based on third hand reports, "From what I have heard, the TM released the drogue below 2,500 feet. The Cypress fired sometime during the snivel, but just before opening shock. (If it had fired after opening shock, the reserve bag would have stayed in the container.) The bag fell out of the container on opening shock. The jumper then cutaway (I don't know why). The reserve, because of its out of sequence deployment, baglocked itself. Nothing was entangled with the Skyhook. From what I know, I see no reason to suspect that the Skyhook was involved in any way. "
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  24. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    13/09/2008 Carolina Skydiving, NC DMAL? 21 /    
    DropZone.com Description:
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  25. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    20/09/2008 Sky Knights, WI NOP,MED? 53 5000 N/? 381 #3339612
    Description: The deceased was visiting the dropzone having brought along a tandem student, which he followed out. The tandem instructor said he appeared to have some kind of problem in freefall, was disorientated and tracked off early, disappearing out of sight. A civilian witness claims no parachute was visible. Police were first on the scene, sealing it off so no experts were able to examine it or the equipment.
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  26. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    21/09/2008 Skydive Orange, VA CCOL 54 15 ?/? 371 #3339981
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper was on final approach on one of his coach jumps when he was struck under canopy by an experienced skydiver. The jumpers remained in a canopy wrap until they hit the ground. The other jumper suffered serious injuries from this collision.
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  27. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    11/10/2008 Perris, CA MED 60 6000 ?/? 395 #3359552
    DropZone.com Description: Jumper tracked away from a 30 way skydive but had a hard opening that released one brake line. The jumper had previously unknown heart disease and the combo of this and the hard opening left him incapacitated. The canopy spiraled into the ground before he was able to correct the situation.
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  28. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    01/11/2008 Skydive Orange, VA LOWT 40 1 ?/Y 394 #3381218
    DropZone.com Description: a tandem pair turned too low to the ground to recover level flight before impact. The pair impacted the ground still in a descending turn. The student, a woman making her first skydive, suffered extensive injuries and died the next day at the hospital. The tandem instructor suffered a broken pelvis and femur and was later released from the hospital
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  29. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    07/11/2008 Skydive Arizona, AZ LOWT 300 ?/? 390 #3388280
    DropZone.com Description: The jumper made 90 degree turn from under 100 feet and impacted at the same time his canopy hit the ground. He was loading the canopy from 1.3-1.5 and was visiting this DZ that had a higher elevation then his home DZ.
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  30. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    26/12/2008 Skydive City, FL FCOL 900 ?/?   #3436222
    Description: The deceased was on the outside of a 2-plane sunset formation load. No collision was seen but two canopies were observed flying off without apparent input. Vehicles immediately set-off after the canopies with co-ordination from a circling aircraft. The other person was found face up, semi-concious, in a pool of water one foot deep, suffered from a broken wrist.
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  31. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    26/12/2008 Perris Valley, CA NOP? 33 ?/?   #3436349
    Description: Thick layers of gloves affecting grasp on the BOC and soft reserve handles and slow deployment after a Cypres fire may have contributed to this fatality.
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  32. Date Location Category Age # Jumps AAD?/RSL? Dropzone.com Report Dropzone.com Discussion
    28/12/2008 Freefall Express, MO NOP 37 300 Y/Y   #3437662
    Description: The deceased exited at approx. 10,000 ft AGL. Witnesses on the ground say that he deployed his main at a reasonable altitude judged to be approx. 3,500 ft. For some reason or another he deemed the parachute unairworthy and decided to perform a cutaway. Witnesses couldn't make out the problem with the main other than the fact that there seemed to be a problem and it probably warranted a chop. Anyhow, after the cutaway he was observed to be struggling or tumbling until impact with the reserve freebag leaving the container at about 50 ft off the ground. At this time we have no way of knowing whether it was turned on or ever activated. His rig was equipped with an RSL. At this time we have no way of knowing whether it was hooked up properly or failed. His reserve handle was pulled and found near the scene, it had no apparent kink in it from an RSL activation.The weather was cold and he was wearing bulky clothing which may have contributed to this fatality.
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